Tea and China’s Great Religions
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Tea and China’s Great Religions

China’s three great philosophy religions—Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism—sprouted toward the middle of the Zhou dynasty. Each of these religions embraced tea for its healthful virtues and powers of rejuvenation. Monks and priests who were introduced to tea found that this beverage would help them stay awake during long meditations. To these holy men, tea represented…
The Character of Tea ‘茶’
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The Character of Tea ‘茶’

The Chinese character for tea is comprised of three parts: the upper part symbolizes “plant” or “grass”; the middle section refers to “man,” especially man’s locale on earth; the bottom portion represents “tree” or “being rooted.” The sum of this character’s elements creates the Chinese pictorial for tea as, “The revered plant that sustains man…
Why does Puerh Tea get more and more fragrant by aging

Why does Puerh Tea get more and more fragrant by aging

Why does the raw Pu’er get more and more fragrant by aging? Without the process of roasting, the enzymes in the tea are still active. So after being exposed to the air, there’s a transformation inside the tea itself naturally, which is what we called aging. During the aging process, the beneficial ingredients contained in…
Tea and Buddhism

Tea and Buddhism

Tea has a close connection with Buddhism. Bodhidharma came to China from India during the Northern and Southern Dynasties (420-589) and he founded the Zen Buddhism in China. He did meditation facing the wall in Shaolin Temple of Songshan Mountain for nine years. It is said that once during his meditation, his eyelids were heavy and he felt sleepy. He simply tore…
Life of Tea
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Life of Tea

Tea, is just a piece of leaf. It was first used as a detoxification remedy when human discovered it.Thousands of years ago, it was made into beverage by the hands of the Chinese. It entered the palace of Tang Dynasty’s poets, and gradually became the most important drink for nomads.It was tucked into the bags…